Federal Law Ordering US Attorney General To Gather Data On Police Excessive Force Has Been Ignored For 20 Yearshttps://www.techdirt.com/articles/20140822/07034228290/federal-law-ordering-us-attorney-general-to-gather-data-police-excessive-force-has-been-ignored-20-years.shtml

(Source: generalinjusticeblog)

biodiverseed:

usda-nrcs:

Carry on the Tradition
In the past, it was customary for people to have a household garden. But with time, this practice faded.
 Millie Titla and her 13-year-old nephew, Noah, want to help bring the tradition back to life.  To do so, they are starting with their local Apache community. Their goal is to help people appreciate what gardens can provide for their families.  “Gardening has been a part of the Apache culture for thousands of years, and we’ve lost the traditional way of gardening throughout the century,” said Millie, who works for NRCS as a district conservationist. 
With his aunt as his mentor, Noah’s passion gardening with tribal traditions has increased awareness of the benefits and availability of fresh food on the southeastern Arizona reservation.  “I didn’t know that such a small community could grow such a good amount of crops,” Noah said about his 4-H club’s community garden. Club members share the harvested food with their friends and families.Through hard work, Noah is making a difference in a state where USDA is targeting assistance through the StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity initiative. Read more here. 
To get started with NRCS, visit your local USDA Service center or www.nrcs.usda.gov/GetStarted.

#USA #Arizona #indigenous
ZoomInfo
biodiverseed:

usda-nrcs:

Carry on the Tradition
In the past, it was customary for people to have a household garden. But with time, this practice faded.
 Millie Titla and her 13-year-old nephew, Noah, want to help bring the tradition back to life.  To do so, they are starting with their local Apache community. Their goal is to help people appreciate what gardens can provide for their families.  “Gardening has been a part of the Apache culture for thousands of years, and we’ve lost the traditional way of gardening throughout the century,” said Millie, who works for NRCS as a district conservationist. 
With his aunt as his mentor, Noah’s passion gardening with tribal traditions has increased awareness of the benefits and availability of fresh food on the southeastern Arizona reservation.  “I didn’t know that such a small community could grow such a good amount of crops,” Noah said about his 4-H club’s community garden. Club members share the harvested food with their friends and families.Through hard work, Noah is making a difference in a state where USDA is targeting assistance through the StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity initiative. Read more here. 
To get started with NRCS, visit your local USDA Service center or www.nrcs.usda.gov/GetStarted.

#USA #Arizona #indigenous
ZoomInfo
biodiverseed:

usda-nrcs:

Carry on the Tradition
In the past, it was customary for people to have a household garden. But with time, this practice faded.
 Millie Titla and her 13-year-old nephew, Noah, want to help bring the tradition back to life.  To do so, they are starting with their local Apache community. Their goal is to help people appreciate what gardens can provide for their families.  “Gardening has been a part of the Apache culture for thousands of years, and we’ve lost the traditional way of gardening throughout the century,” said Millie, who works for NRCS as a district conservationist. 
With his aunt as his mentor, Noah’s passion gardening with tribal traditions has increased awareness of the benefits and availability of fresh food on the southeastern Arizona reservation.  “I didn’t know that such a small community could grow such a good amount of crops,” Noah said about his 4-H club’s community garden. Club members share the harvested food with their friends and families.Through hard work, Noah is making a difference in a state where USDA is targeting assistance through the StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity initiative. Read more here. 
To get started with NRCS, visit your local USDA Service center or www.nrcs.usda.gov/GetStarted.

#USA #Arizona #indigenous
ZoomInfo
biodiverseed:

usda-nrcs:

Carry on the Tradition
In the past, it was customary for people to have a household garden. But with time, this practice faded.
 Millie Titla and her 13-year-old nephew, Noah, want to help bring the tradition back to life.  To do so, they are starting with their local Apache community. Their goal is to help people appreciate what gardens can provide for their families.  “Gardening has been a part of the Apache culture for thousands of years, and we’ve lost the traditional way of gardening throughout the century,” said Millie, who works for NRCS as a district conservationist. 
With his aunt as his mentor, Noah’s passion gardening with tribal traditions has increased awareness of the benefits and availability of fresh food on the southeastern Arizona reservation.  “I didn’t know that such a small community could grow such a good amount of crops,” Noah said about his 4-H club’s community garden. Club members share the harvested food with their friends and families.Through hard work, Noah is making a difference in a state where USDA is targeting assistance through the StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity initiative. Read more here. 
To get started with NRCS, visit your local USDA Service center or www.nrcs.usda.gov/GetStarted.

#USA #Arizona #indigenous
ZoomInfo
biodiverseed:

usda-nrcs:

Carry on the Tradition
In the past, it was customary for people to have a household garden. But with time, this practice faded.
 Millie Titla and her 13-year-old nephew, Noah, want to help bring the tradition back to life.  To do so, they are starting with their local Apache community. Their goal is to help people appreciate what gardens can provide for their families.  “Gardening has been a part of the Apache culture for thousands of years, and we’ve lost the traditional way of gardening throughout the century,” said Millie, who works for NRCS as a district conservationist. 
With his aunt as his mentor, Noah’s passion gardening with tribal traditions has increased awareness of the benefits and availability of fresh food on the southeastern Arizona reservation.  “I didn’t know that such a small community could grow such a good amount of crops,” Noah said about his 4-H club’s community garden. Club members share the harvested food with their friends and families.Through hard work, Noah is making a difference in a state where USDA is targeting assistance through the StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity initiative. Read more here. 
To get started with NRCS, visit your local USDA Service center or www.nrcs.usda.gov/GetStarted.

#USA #Arizona #indigenous
ZoomInfo
biodiverseed:

usda-nrcs:

Carry on the Tradition
In the past, it was customary for people to have a household garden. But with time, this practice faded.
 Millie Titla and her 13-year-old nephew, Noah, want to help bring the tradition back to life.  To do so, they are starting with their local Apache community. Their goal is to help people appreciate what gardens can provide for their families.  “Gardening has been a part of the Apache culture for thousands of years, and we’ve lost the traditional way of gardening throughout the century,” said Millie, who works for NRCS as a district conservationist. 
With his aunt as his mentor, Noah’s passion gardening with tribal traditions has increased awareness of the benefits and availability of fresh food on the southeastern Arizona reservation.  “I didn’t know that such a small community could grow such a good amount of crops,” Noah said about his 4-H club’s community garden. Club members share the harvested food with their friends and families.Through hard work, Noah is making a difference in a state where USDA is targeting assistance through the StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity initiative. Read more here. 
To get started with NRCS, visit your local USDA Service center or www.nrcs.usda.gov/GetStarted.

#USA #Arizona #indigenous
ZoomInfo

biodiverseed:

usda-nrcs:

Carry on the Tradition

In the past, it was customary for people to have a household garden. But with time, this practice faded.

Millie Titla and her 13-year-old nephew, Noah, want to help bring the tradition back to life.  To do so, they are starting with their local Apache community. Their goal is to help people appreciate what gardens can provide for their families.

“Gardening has been a part of the Apache culture for thousands of years, and we’ve lost the traditional way of gardening throughout the century,” said Millie, who works for NRCS as a district conservationist.

With his aunt as his mentor, Noah’s passion gardening with tribal traditions has increased awareness of the benefits and availability of fresh food on the southeastern Arizona reservation.

“I didn’t know that such a small community could grow such a good amount of crops,” Noah said about his 4-H club’s community garden. Club members share the harvested food with their friends and families.

Through hard work, Noah is making a difference in a state where USDA is targeting assistance through the StrikeForce for Rural Growth and Opportunity initiative. Read more here.

To get started with NRCS, visit your local USDA Service center or www.nrcs.usda.gov/GetStarted.

#USA #Arizona #indigenous

U.S. allies with terrorists to fight terroristshttp://theweek.com/speedreads/index/266974/speedreads-us-allies-with-terrorists-to-fight-terrorists

hipsterlibertarian:

Here we go again.

The State Department has labeled the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) a terrorist organization since 1997, but now the U.S. government is allying with the group to fight ISIS in Kurdistan, reports AllGov.

As noted by the National Counterterrorism Center, the PKK’s “urban terrorism wing, the Kurdistan Freedom Hawks (TAK), in 2005 began using terrorist tactics — including suicide bombing — [and] claimed responsibility for a 2010 attack on a military bus, killing five, and a suicide bombing the same year that wounded 32 in Istanbul.”

This is not the first time the United States has worked with questionable allies. For example, the origins of the brutal Taliban regime in Afghanistan can be traced to American support during the Cold War. 

- - Bonnie Kristian

(via lillabet)

skirkalurk:

Meet Ben Greene. He’s a student turned entrepreneur from Raleigh, NC. His brain child, The Farmery, promises to bring a whole new way of life to urban locavores.

“The Farmery is essentially a template to celebrate local foods,” Greene says. “There’s not really a grocery mall designed for urban communities. We make it available to different demographics.”

The idea is relatively simple: bring vegetable production, harvest and distribution together in a single location, right in the middle of town. A modified farmer’s market, The Farmery eliminates the middle man and brings fresh-picked produce almost directly to the consumer’s doorstep. 

“The Farmery could be potentially much more financially successful (than other urban farms) and make its way into the mainstream of our economy,” claims Greene. “By growing and selling in the same place, you can get a much higher profit margin.” 

The Farmery is constructed primarily from repurposed shipping containers and greenhouse implements. Hanging from the outside of the containers, herbs, strawberries and greens are grown aquaponically. Aquaponics refers to the practice of raising fish in the water supply to provide nutrients and keep disease in check. 

Source

YES

(Source: thefreelioness)

Oklahoma Cop Charged With Raping 6 Women While on Patrolhttp://time.com/3159146/oklahoma-police-rape/

ethiopienne:

trigger warning: rape, sexual assault

An Oklahoma City police officer was arrested Thursday and charged sexually assaulting at least six women while he was on patrol, though police expect more alleged victims to come forward.

Daniel Holtzclaw is charged with rape, oral sodomy and sexual battery. The three-year veteran of the force is being held on a $5 million bond, Reuters reports.

Police said the assaults took place while Holtzclaw was on the job, in some cases as a result of traffic stops.

(via ttropico)

If taxation without consent is not robbery, then any band of robbers have only to declare themselves a government, and all their robberies are legalized.
Lysander Spooner (via appalachiananarchist)

I see people saying “How can this happen? Isn’t this America?”

king-emare:

celluloidsheep:

image

image

Well, yes. This IS America.

image

image

(US Army attacks homeless veterans protesting in Washington, DC in 1932)

image

image

1960s Birmingham, Alabama

image

image

1970 attack on unarmed student protesters at Kent State University

image

image

Police action at peaceful UC Davis Occupy protest 

Let’s not pretend like the police actions taken this week are anything new. It’s just the most recent manifestation of a problem America has had for a very long time.

^^^^^^^

(via mostlyjudson)